Category: Writing Tips

Why 2020’s NaNoWriMo Will Be Different

Earlier tonight, Boris Johnson announced that the UK would be going to a second national lockdown. I know people across the country will be devastated – friends included – but I’ve been feeling a resigned calm. Here we go again. For a lot of… Continue Reading “Why 2020’s NaNoWriMo Will Be Different”

Your Novel Should (Probably) Be In Chronological Order

Non-linear narratives can be super engaging and fun, but are prone to problems that kill their good qualities. So when should a story be told in a non-linear way?

Top 10 Reasons Readers Abandon Books

I embody my worst fear as a writer. If I’m abandoning books, other people are too. But why?

3 Things Video Games Teach Us About Writing First Chapters

When searching for writing tips, video games are rarely used as case studies. Which is sad. And disappointing. Fantastic stories are told through games, let’s acknowledge what they can teach us about writing.

Please Stop Putting Spoilers In Book Blurbs

Whenever I buy a book, I look at the blurb first. Point is – they matter. So, please, can you stop with the spoilers?

An Important Difference Between Chapters & Scenes In Books

Anyone who has read a book knows what a chapter is – a break in the flow of text that makes up a novel. A handy place for a reader to decide whether to stick in a bookmark, fold the corner of the page,… Continue Reading “An Important Difference Between Chapters & Scenes In Books”

Write A Great Opener – FROZEN FIRE

The first chapter of Tim Bowler’s Frozen Fire is pretty good, and with an opening line like “I’m dying.” it’s hard not to be. That’s right, it’s time for another opening scene breakdown.

Perfectionist Writers, How To Resist Editing Your Story

How to resist editing before you’ve finished your first draft, and immediately after.

Write A Great Opener – THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH

The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis. What makes the first chapter work?

Write A Great Opener – BABY DRIVER

Last time, we looked at Mr. Robot. This time, we’re looking at Edgar Wright’s Baby Driver. What techniques are used to engage the audience?

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